Your Healthcare Checklist Before Trump Takes Office

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With Donald Trump and Mike Pence about to lead U.S. politics in just a few weeks, U.S. healthcare could get a radical overhaul.

Trump plans to repeal Obamacare, which the Congressional Budget Office believes could increase the number of uninsured Americans to 22 million. But before he takes office, there are plenty of things you can do to take control of your health and minimize any potential damage from an Obamacare repeal.

Have Obamacare? Speak Up: Even if Trump repeals the Affordable Care Act, that wouldn’t go into effect immediately. Contact your legislative representatives and let them know how changes would affect your healthcare coverage and your ability to take care of yourself.

“If enough people show their elected representatives how this change would adversely affect them, there is a possibility that some aspects of the law will be protected,” said Miriam Laugesen, an associate professor at Columbia University and the author of a book on medical pricing, to Huffington Post.

Don’t Have Obamacare? Sign Up For It: Any changes to the Affordable Care Act probably wouldn’t go into effect for another full year. If you’re uninsured and don’t have coverage through your employer, it’s essential that you protect yourself. There are plenty of options for reduced-cost coverage for those with low or fixed incomes.

Make A Birth Control Plan: Both Trump and Pence are pro-life. Talk to your doctor about preventive services like pap smears and contraceptive services. Discuss how you’re going to prepare for your next pregnancy. Consider getting an intrauterine device, which lasts between three to ten years and is currently free under the Affordable Care Act.

Get Your Screenings In Now: Women past their childbearing years should discuss age-appropriate screenings with their doctors. Costly procedures, such as bone density scans and mammograms, should be top priority in case they’re not covered in the future. Addressing things like sexual or urinary incontinence can also be considered.